Nigeria Crisis Response Plan 2024-2025

Last updated: February 15 2024
$101,022,958
Funding required
7,900,000
People in need
2,241,936
People Targeted

IOM Vision

IOM aims to support the transition towards comprehensive, evidence-based, longer-term solutions for displacement in close collaboration with the Federal Government of Nigeria, partners, communities, and populations on the move, to deliver life-saving assistance while improving the resilience of the displaced population and local communities.

Key Operating Modalities
Participation and empowerment Conflict sensitivity Integrated Programming Collaboration and partnership Localization Cash-based interventions
Cross-cutting priorities
Data and evidence Protection Mainstreaming Gender Equality Prevention of sexual exploitation and abuse Disaster Risk Climate Change Law and policy

Objective 1 - Saving lives and protecting people on the move
Objective
Saving lives and protecting people on the move

$38,295,286
Funding required
2,047,536
People Targeted
232
Entities Targeted
Former combatant / fighter, Internal migrant, Internally displaced person, International migrant, Local population / community
Primary target groups
Description of People and Entities Targeted

IOM will ensure greater attention and support to the needs of the most vulnerable groups affected by conflict or by high impact natural hazard events (floods and climate change) such as child-headed households, the elderly, single-headed families, persons with disabilities, survivors of protection incidents (including GBV), and victims of trafficking (VoTs). Support will be tailored to IDPs and new arrivals, including those who are living in camps and camp-like settings, those in host communities, vulnerable host communities in areas of displacement, communities of return where services are inadequate, and IDP returnees who are facing severe conditions such as residual insecurity, damage to properties and public infrastructure, limited access to services and livelihood opportunities, and fractured social relations. 

IOM will support the government, including national and local authorities, and selected Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) and community leaders through training and technical assistance on preparedness. Key stakeholders under this action include: the Government of Nigeria and key local authorities to improve preparedness plans and coordination with humanitarian and other actors; IDPs, local populations, local community leaders and community volunteers who can ensure the continuity of essential services during emergencies and disasters related to natural hazards; as well as educational and medical institutions that can help to build local, sustainable, and context-specific health and MHPSS capacities.

IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) continues to capture and monitor displacement and population movements and enables humanitarian actors to make informed decisions and design their interventions based on needs of mobile populations in situations of crisis, conflict, or emergencies. IOM will strengthen the information management and monitoring systems of critical needs and gaps and support the overall humanitarian response planning in provision of evidence-based CCCM, Shelter and NFI responses. IOM will also strengthen accountability for affected populations through documenting innovative local solutions in the CCCM, Shelter and NFI responses to support recovery mechanisms.

Camp coordination and camp management

Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) will continue to support an accountable and equitable response for the displaced population in Nigeria through:

  • Co-leadership of the CCCM, Shelter, NFI Sector with the National Emergency Management Agency in Northeast Nigeria to strengthen the coordination mechanism with partners, enhance the technical capacity, and facilitate people-centered approaches in managing camp and camp-like settings, and find appropriate and sustainable solutions for the displaced families. 
  • Management and facilitation of camps in Adamawa and Borno states to ensure equitable access to basic services, life-saving protection, and improved living conditions for displaced populations.
  • Conduct of site improvements, care and maintenance towards mitigation of climate change-induced hazards ensuring a safe and accessible camp environment.
  • Capacity development initiatives for partners and stakeholders at all levels including IDPs and host community leaders and members on various CCCM thematic areas.  
  • Promotion of accountability and people-centered approaches in camps through community-based feedback mechanisms, communication with communities, and tailored activities for women and girls through the Women’s Participation Project.  
  • Facilitation of sustainable solutions for displaced families by coordinating with government partners, stakeholders, and humanitarian actors, ensuring IDPs make informed decisions on returning to original communities, local integration, or resettling.
  • Facilitation of planned camp closures, in line with the Minimum Standards for Camp Management, in locations where families found durable solutions through safe, informed, and voluntary returns, integration, or resettlement.  
  • Management and maintenance of reception centers and transit sites through a multi-sectoral rapid response ensuring new arrivals receive proper and immediate life-saving support.  
  • Strengthening of information management and monitoring systems of critical needs and gaps and support the overall humanitarian response planning in provision of evidence-based responses.
  • Conduct of regular monitoring and evaluation to strengthen accountability for affected populations and document innovative local solutions to support recovery mechanisms.
     
Funding required
$6,000,000
Plan types

Direct health support

As part of IOM’s effort in responding to public health concerns (health emergencies, outbreaks, and diseases) of the crisis-affected populations (IDPs and host communities), IOM will work with the Ministry of Health, Primary Health Care Development Agency, health sectors/clusters, and other partners to implement emergency health response activities, preparedness, and risk reduction through:

  • Enhancement of emergency healthcare services through mobile health teams by identifying, screening, administering first-aid treatment, and medical referrals to available secondary and tertiary healthcare facilities.
  • Promotion of preventive health through health awareness and sensitization programs using different media platforms, safe-spaces, fliers, banners, radio jingles, and Television (TV) programs.
  • Ensuring and enabling preparedness for public health emergencies including cross-border disease surveillance collaboration and coordination based on the One Health approach and global health security through active participation with established government platforms, health sectors/clusters, and Risk Communication and Community Engagement (RCCE).
  • Advancement of prevention, control, and surveillance of infectious diseases during outbreaks, epidemics, conflicts, and disasters.
     
Funding required
$5,000,000
Plan types

Mental health and psychosocial support in humanitarian response

IOM will provide a holistic set of mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) services covering all layers of MHPSS intervention through Psychosocial Mobile Teams (PMTs). IOM promotes international standards as outlined in the IASC Guidance on MHPSS in Emergencies and IOM Manual on CB MHPSS in Emergencies and Displacement. These activities will include:

  • Provision of direct community-based MHPSS services to displaced populations and returnees in camps, informal settlements and host communities in the BAY states. Services will include: psychoeducation and awareness raising, socio-relational activities (such as sport and plays, rituals and celebration, art based and cultural activities, etc.), focused interventions (such as counselling and support groups), as well as referrals to specialized mental health care. Provision of services will happen through MHPSS resource centres/safe spaces and the deployment of multidisciplinary PMTs including government staff (e.g., social workers), mental health referral teams, and psychiatric nurses.
  • Direct psychosocial support through the PMTs (incl. PFA, referrals to other services and lay-counselling) to particularly vulnerable groups, including survivors of GBV and VoTs. 
  • Provision of remote psychosocial support (including counselling and referrals) through IOM’s emotional support hotline, to reach distressed persons in hard-to-reach locations.
  • Protection will be mainstreamed in all MHPSS activities and services.
     
Funding required
$2,500,000
Plan types

Protection

In collaboration with protection partners, and integration of relevant government staff (e.g., staff of the Ministry of Health and social workers from the Ministry of Women Affairs and Social Development) as members of the PMTs, IOM will provide the following services:

  • Mainstreaming protection into other sectors of the humanitarian service provision, including, GBV, gender, disability, trafficking and MHPSS by enhancing the capacities of humanitarian actors to integrate protection, including MHPSS principles in their work. 
  • Ensuring case management of persons at risk and victims of trafficking (VoTs), internally and in collaboration with other actors on ground involved in the Anti-trafficking mechanisms available in Nigeria; this includes Adults and children trafficked, as well as internally displaced persons and international migrants identified. 
  • Protection-focused messaging in the form of awareness raising on GBV, trafficking in persons (TiP), sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA), child trafficking and abuse through the dissemination of key messages (in the form of IEC materials, radio jingles, and radio discussions) programmes as well as focus group discussions in partnership with local protection and governmental actors including trained law enforcement officers. 
  • Enhancing the capacities of existing community structures such as youth groups, local associations and partners, men and women committees and deploying them in conducting awareness raising at the community level, and conducting some form of community-based (CB) MHPSS services and activities, which include safe and dignified referrals, family and group support sessions among others.
  • Distribution of material assistance including dignity kits for women and girls of reproductive age, NFIs and food baskets, education material, and start-up kits for the most vulnerable sub-groups of the affected populations. 
  • Strengthening the ongoing mitigation of protection risks through the conduct of safety audits, safety mapping, protection risk analysis, and training. 
  • Mainstreaming protection (including GBV, SEA, TiP) throughout the humanitarian response in Northeast/Northwest/North Central Nigeria, in close cooperation with other protection actors 
  • Strengthening of counter-trafficking activities in the Borno Adamawa and Yobe (BAY) states of Northeast Nigeria, which includes providing capacity-building support to protection actors, direct assistance to P/VoTs as well as coordination of counter-trafficking responses through the Anti-trafficking state taskforces and the protection sector and the Areas of Responsibility.  
  • Continued capacity building of government agencies (including Nigerian Police Force (NPF), Nigerian Civil Defence Corps (NCDSC), and the National Agency for the Prevention of Trafficking in Person (NAPTIP), and other government entities) on GBV, TiP, SEA prevention, response, and community engagement 
  • Strengthening of the referral mechanism for survivors and potential VoTs to other services, including health care, MHPSS, legal services, livelihoods, etc.  
Funding required
$2,500,000
Plan types

Shelter and settlements

IOM will continue to promote safe and dignified living conditions in the immediate and medium term and address land and property issues to respond to internal and cross-border movement caused by conflict, disasters, and climate change impacts through the following activities:

  • Settlement level interventions: Site and Settlement planning, upgrading of settlement infrastructure, participatory enumeration, address systems, among others, including activities to reduce risk related to settlement conditions (in coordination with CCCM, WASH, DRR, and other sectors).
  • Housing Land and Property: Activities that support upholding, improving, or restoring security of tenure. Interventions may be at the individual or settlement level (Occupancy contracts, due diligence, restoring documents, informal settlements upgrades or formalization, etc.).
  • Market-based interventions, including cash to access NFI/shelter/housing (may include cash or voucher assistance for rental, repairs, reconstruction, shelter NFI and Household Items), and for supporting community infrastructure at settlement level.
  • Provision of material, technical and/or financial assistance for self-recovery, including Information Education and Communication (IEC), training or support to Build Back Better (in coordination with DRR).
  • Pre-positioning and/or distribution of shelter materials.
  • Pre-positioning and/or distribution of Household Items.
  • Design, set up/construction, upgrades of emergency shelters, including individual and collective accommodation options (in coordination with CCCM)
  • Design, set-up/construction, upgrades of transitional/core shelters and housing.
  • Repair and retrofitting of damaged homes.

As the co-lead of the CCCM, Shelter, NFI Sector with the National Emergency Management Agency and UNHCR in Northeast Nigeria, IOM will continue to strengthen the coordination mechanism with partners, enhance the technical capacity, and facilitate people-centered approaches in the provision of Shelter and NFI responses. The activities will also include:

  • Advocate for mainstreaming hazard specific and responsive and eco-friendly designs and approaches in Shelter and settlements responses, specifically by supporting environmental consideration in IDP site plans, shelter designs, and materials used to produce the NFIs and building materials.
  • Capacity development initiatives for partners and stakeholders at all levels including IDPs and host community leaders and members on various Shelter and NFI responses thematic areas.  
  • Through a multi-sectorial approach and in coordination with the relevant government entities the sector will facilitate Shelter and Settlement responses in pathways towards durable solutions for the displaced population.
Funding required
$12,945,286
Plan types

Provision of water, sanitation and hygiene in emergencies

Through its WASH program, IOM will continue implementing actions to prevent and control the spread of waterborne and sanitation-related diseases, such as cholera, typhoid, and diarrhoea. IOM will continue to provide maintenance and operation services for WASH infrastructure in IDP camps and permanent hygiene promotion campaigns. IOM will further reinforce several key aspects of the sustainability of emergency responses including: 

  • Improvement of the design of WASH infrastructure to protect the electromechanical equipment against theft and vandalism and increase resistance to weather and effects of climate change.
  • Strengthening of local technical capacity in the maintenance and operation of WASH services through capacity-building activities .
  • Continued leadership of the Sanitation TWG, focusing the group's main objective on finding innovative solutions for the Faecal Sludge Management (FSM) in IDP camps. 
  • Improvement of emergency WASH responses to support the increasing climate change-affected population (flooding and droughts). 
  • Adaptation of the WASH Core Pipeline strategy to a post-emergency context.
  • Continue as a key partner agency of the WASH Sector, strengthening coordination with government WASH agencies.
Funding required
$3,000,000
Plan types

Emergency preparedness

IOM CCCM, Shelter, and NFI Sector emergency preparedness activities will aim to build both resilience and response capacity of communities, partner organizations, and governments by putting resources and preparedness and response plans in place to better address future emergencies, increase the value for money of relief action and ensure that scarce resources are directed to where they will have the greatest impact. The following will constitute emergency preparedness activities: 

  • Strengthen the capacity of Shelter and CCCM partners, relevant authorities, stakeholders, and affected communities on disaster risk and preparedness through tailored training and the provision of technical guidance on displacement management and support.
  • Setting up disaster preparedness mechanisms for climate-induced disasters in flood-prone communities and existing camps and camp-like settings for local authorities and partners such as MEND (Mass Evacuation in Natural Disasters), identification of collective centers, and building the displacement management capacity of the community first responders.
Funding required
$1,500,000
Plan types

Displacement tracking

DTM activities will focus on the Northeast, North West and North Central regions of Nigeria. IOM will continue to conduct mobility tracking assessments to gather and analyse data to disseminate critical multi-layered information on the mobility and mobility intentions, vulnerabilities, and needs of displaced and mobile populations to continue to enable decision-makers and responders to provide the affected populations with better context-specific assistance. In particular, IOM's displacement tracking initiatives will include:

  • Solutions and Mobility Index (SMI): The SMI tracks context-specific data across four key areas: safety and security, access to services and infrastructure, social cohesion and resilience to climate change and disasters. It helps identify smaller pockets of stability and fragility by measuring local community perceptions and generating broader regional data on stability. It further helps identify the root causes of fragility and protracted displacement. It provides indicators on stability to support humanitarians targeting their response to address peace, development, recovery, and reintegration dynamics to help achieve durable solutions for vulnerable communities.  
  • Intention Surveys (IS): Through this, IOM DTM will assess the interests, preferences, choices, aspirations, conditions, and opportunities displaced communities have towards pursuing sustainable solutions through local integration, relocation, or return to places of origin. 
  • Perception Survey (PS): Through the PS tool, IOM DTM will assess the perception, reaction, attitude, and belief of host communities and host local authorities towards the existing displaced individuals, families, and communities, as well as displaced communities who may be planning or in the process of integrating with or nearby communities. The data collected and analysed through perception surveys can identify potential risks of hostility, competition, and causes of violence and areas of intervention for promoting social cohesion and peaceful co-existence. 
  • Comparative Analysis: IOM will generate baseline data from assessments capturing conditions of returned IDPs towards local integration and resettlement as compared to non-displaced host or resident communities as measured against the core IASC criteria aimed at measuring progress towards solutions as well as identifying key obstacles to solutions.
  • Mobility Tracking (MT): IOM, through DTM, will continue to track mobility in areas of displacement and solutions (return, integration, and resettlement) to ascertain the needs and gaps of the forcibly displaced populations for planning and response. The MT regularly and systematically tracks mobility, demography, and cross-sectorial needs of observed populations in locations of interest to target assistance.   
  • Emergency Tracking Tool (ETT): DTM conducts weekly ETT in Borno and Adamawa states because of movements due to attacks or fear of attacks.
  • Transhumance Tracking Tool (TTT): The TTT gathers crucial data concerning transhumance migration within four LGAs in Adamawa State in the Northeast and Katsina State in Northwest Nigeria. Its primary objective is to provide the necessary information along both recognized and unofficial transhumance routes aimed at conflict prevention and peacebuilding through early warning and early response. 
  • Registration: Through the registration, IOM will provide a more in-depth analysis of specific needs by capturing the biometric data of the affected populations in areas of solutions using the DTM-developed Biometric Registration and Verification Application (B.R.a.Ve) as part of the country stock figure on solution pathway. 
  • Flow Monitoring (FM): DTM tracks movements from and to bordering countries to better inform the reasons for movements across the selected borders between Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad Republic, and Niger Republic. The activity helps to understand the motivations behind movements and the location of interest of the people on the move, both inflows and outflows, in each covered geographical area.
  • Climate Vulnerability Assessment: IOM will start a pilot assessment on climate vulnerability to understand some of the drivers of climate-induced displacement in Nigeria in some selected states. DTM tools in IOM Nigeria will be updated to consider the implementation of specific climate vulnerability assessment indicators to provide indicative data on whether climate change and environmental degradation have contributed to the displacement and its impact in Nigeria.
  • Capacity-Building: IOM will continue to strengthen its partners in data management, such as the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA), State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA), Nigeria Red Cross Society (NRCS), and particularly, the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) on the International Recommendation on IDP Statistics (IRIS), addressing data gaps and standardizing analysis approaches to increase national ownership of data for solutions and improve data availability, interoperability, quality and relevance across the solutions' pathway.
Funding required
$2,850,000
Plan types

Support services for response actors

IOM will continue the operations of the Humanitarian Hubs as the primary provider of interagency common services in the region, providing essential services to support the humanitarian sector in delivering life-saving assistance. These hubs offer safe accommodations, office and meeting spaces, and internet service, playing a pivotal role in delivering humanitarian services to over one million IDPs and host communities surrounding the LGAs of the Hubs’ eight locations in Borno state. In 2024, this will include:

  • Continuation of hosting and provision of services to up to 5,000 humanitarian workers from 150 organizations, facilitating access to affected populations and promoting coordination, collaboration, and overall effectiveness among humanitarian responders.

As the co-lead for the CCCM/Shelter-NFI sector, IOM will continue to promote coherent, protection-oriented humanitarian responses for displaced populations through a strengthened inter-sectorial approach in CCCM, Shelter, and NFI responses among its humanitarian partners across BAY states. Through its coordination role, work will include:

  • Strengthening the capacity of humanitarian partners to respond and enhance inter-sectorial coordination, promoting accountability to the affected population while advocating for a people-centred, lasting solution to displacement.  
Funding required
$2,000,000
Plan types
Women sensitization on GBV in Adamawa State. © Stephen Jafiya / IOM Nigeria 2023.
Women sensitization on GBV in Adamawa State. © Stephen Jafiya / IOM Nigeria 2023.

Objective 2 - Driving solutions to displacement
Objective
Driving solutions to displacement

$62,727,672
Funding required
194,400
People Targeted
19
Entities Targeted
Former combatant / fighter, Internal migrant, Internally displaced person, International migrant, Local population / community
Primary target groups
Description of People and Entities Targeted

The worsening of the crisis, along with increased economic instability and lack of access to basic services put an increasing number of people in precarious situations. IOM programming will contribute to addressing the underlying drivers of the instability in the Northeast and North West, including through peace and reconciliation, peace and security programming in places of habitual residence, restoration of basic services, infrastructure, local governance capacity, environmental degradation stemming from land use management practices, rebuilding livelihoods, and restoring social fabrics and trust. IOM will also address the trauma and psychosocial effects of the conflict on the most vulnerable groups such as women, youth and child-headed households, as well as older persons, single-headed families and persons with disabilities, GBV survivors and VoTs. IOM’s support will target: IDPs living in camps or camp-like settings and host communities; returnees; host communities; flood-affected communities; ex-combatants and associates of reintegrated former combatants; government at Federal State, LGA, and Ward levels; UN agencies, INGO, Local NGOs and associations; farmer-herder communities and transboundary mobile communities where individuals formerly associated with NSAGs are returning.

IOM will support the government, including national and local authorities, and selected Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) and community leaders through training and technical assistance on disaster risk reduction. Key stakeholders under this action include: Government of Nigeria and key local authorities to improve preparedness plans and coordination with humanitarian and other actors; IDPs, local populations, local community leaders and community volunteers who can ensure the continuity of essential services during emergencies and disasters related to natural hazards; as well as educational and medical institutions that can help build local, sustainable, and context-specific health and MHPSS capacities.

Livelihoods and economic recovery

IOM aims to promote community resilience to better cope with shocks resulting from violence and natural hazards through improved food security, livelihood, and economic opportunities grounded in enhanced community engagement, capacity, and resources. The planned activities will target IDPs and host communities with a particular focus on women and youth through the provision of tailored and locally viable on-farm and off-farm livelihoods with linkages with market access. This will include:

  • Support to enterprise development through targeted grant mechanisms to small and medium scale Enterprises (SMEs) and capacity building of farmers’ training centers (FTC) and vocational training centers  to promote job creation and employment opportunities for IDPs including host communities.
  • Support the establishment of saving and credit cooperatives (SACCOs), with the inclusion of women and vulnerable community members from both IDPs and host communities, along with the capacity building on financial recording and small business management for the cooperatives, and provision of seed money.
  • Provision of vocational trainings based on market and labour assessment followed by the provision of start-ups including tools and business incubators, including modern beekeeping; participatory range land management; fertility improvement and moisture harvesting techniques; improved crop practices and integrated pest management; production of fuel-saving stoves; drip irrigation management; and food processing skills.
  • Establishment of a livestock market information system.
  • Provision of adaptable and drought-resistant crop varieties and vegetable seeds in collaboration with the Agricultural Research Institute; improved chicken breeds; farm tools; multi-purpose seedlings, including communal seed nursery sites for animal fodder and fattening; drip irrigation kits and solar-powered pumps; and fuel-saving stove molds.
  • Promotion of vegetable production at farm backyards and around water points, and construction of communal pond for water reservation for multi-purpose use.
  • Establishment of fuel-saving stove producers’ groups.
  • Provision of vocational trainings and reintegration support for former NSAG associates graduating from the Federal Rehabilitation Programme, Operation Safe Corridor, and the Borno Model. Socio-economic support will include a two-for-one approach accounting for community members
Funding required
$4,500,000
Plan types

Land and property

IOM will continue promoting access to safe and dignified shelter solutions and associated household items, as well as addressing land and property  using a holistic pathway to solutions based on environmental variables, the impact of humanitarian response, climate change, and sustainable development. The activities include:

  • Support to IDPs and host communities to access adequate land for housing and agriculture/livelihood activities and promote their rights to housing land and property (HLP) in close collaboration with local authorities.
  • Community awareness and advisory services for affected populations and training for government authorities and partners on HLP rights.
  • HLP assessments and documentation of violations of HLP rights.
  • Restoration/registration of land and property title documents in collaboration with the relevant government authorities.
  • Support (capacity and material) to dispute resolution mechanisms to address HLP-related issues/disputes.
  • Application of a settlement damage assessment index using four different categories (lightly-damaged, medium to lightly-damaged, heavily-damaged, and completely-damaged settlements) to explore innovative activities such as Rehabilitation for Rent (R4R).
  • Design, set-up/construction, upgrades of transitional/core shelters and housing.
  • Settlement level interventions: Site and Settlement planning, upgrading of settlement infrastructure, participatory enumeration, address systems, etc., including activities to reduce risk related to settlement conditions (in coordination with CCCM, WASH, DRR, and other sectors).
  • Market-based interventions, including cash to access NFI/shelter/housing (may include cash or voucher assistance for rental, repairs, reconstruction, shelter NFI and household items), and for supporting community infrastructure at settlement level.
  • Provision of material, technical and/or financial assistance for self-recovery, including information education and communication (IEC), training or support to Build Back Better (in coordination with DRR).
  • Through a multi-sectorial approach and in coordination with the relevant government entities the sector will facilitate Shelter and Settlement responses in pathways towards durable solutions for the displaced population.
     
Funding required
$9,927,672
Plan types

Provision of water, sanitation and hygiene in transitional and post-crisis situations

In line with the evolution of the humanitarian context in Northeast Nigeria, IOM will reinforce the contributions to a comprehensive and coordinated approach supporting sustainable solutions for displaced populations, such as voluntary return, local integration, or resettlement. This includes:

  • Restoration or improvement of the WASH infrastructure and services in the areas of origin or destination, ensuring equitable access to water and sanitation for displaced and host communities, and promoting social cohesion and peacebuilding. 
  • In close coordination with water authorities, strengthening the resilience of the supported population to cope with shocks and stresses due to climate change, improving the governance and management of water resources and flooding.

IOM will also continue to enhance the resilience of WASH systems and services to cope with shocks and stresses, such as floods, droughts, conflicts, and epidemics. This will be achieved through:

  • Improving the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of WASH facilities and promoting water management.
  • Support to the WASH Sector contingency capacity through the common pipeline of WASH NFIs in Northeast Nigeria, a central repository of WASH NFI supplies mechanism that keeps the Sector's capacity to respond to critical humanitarian needs, assuring harmonization of items and enabling uniform and coordinated responses.
  • In partnership with Deltares and the Nigeria Hydrological Services Agency continue developing the platform of tools for water resources and water-related risk management.


 

Funding required
$4,250,000
Plan types

Mental health and psychosocial support in transition and recovery

Community-based MHPSS plays an important role in transition and recovery processes, as it contributes towards collective healing and fosters social cohesion. It is therefore crucial for peacebuilding and reconciliation processes, increased resilience of communities, and reintegration efforts. Contributions towards these objectives and the overall durable solutions approach includes:

  • Provision as part of community-based psychosocial support services of: social skills training for members of the IDP, returning and host communities; family/group support sessions (e.g., for parents, women, returnees); culturally and socially appropriate socio-relational and cultural activities (incl. art-based activities, rituals, and celebrations) for IDPs, returnees, and members of the host communities.
  • Provision of joint group-based activities for returnees and host community members that aim to increase social support, mutual understanding, solidarity, and strengthened interpersonal support networks.
  • Promotion of human capacity aimed at helping affected populations to adapt to changing contexts. The human capacity to be promoted includes functioning (a person is actively engaged in community activities), capabilities (a person’s opportunity and ability to generate valuable outcomes, considering relevant personal characteristics and external factors), and agency (the ability of a person to bring about change, which achievement can be evaluated in terms of an individual’s values and objectives). 
  • Supporting activities such as community dialogues among herder and farmer communities in the Northwest to reduce tensions and support mutual understanding. 
  • Provision of focused training on durable solution (DS) concepts and terminologies, key guiding principles and approaches, context analysis and application for MHPSS staff, and close coordination with other relevant DS actors.

To sustain IOM’s MHPSS activities in the Northeast and Northwest of Nigeria, the following activities will aim at system strengthening: 

  • Development of the capacity of line ministries’ staff including from the Ministry of Health (e.g., primary health care staff) and psychiatric nurses working at the Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital in Maiduguri and the BAY states’ Specialist Hospitals, as well as partners’ staff working (e.g., NGOs providing direct MHPSS assistance to the affected populations) by the provision of training in approaches or models of community-based MHPSS intervention, basic psychosocial skills, mainstreaming MHPSS and Protection, and development of CB MHPSS services and activities among others.
  • Ensuring regular information sharing, adherence to relevant standards and guidelines, and the efficient use of resources among partners, through IOM’s role as co-chair of the MHPSS TWG.
  • Enhancement of the collaboration built with the Neuropsychiatric Hospital in Borno State and the State Specialist Hospital in Adamawa State for the provision of specialized mental health services.
  • Ensuring continuity and the rollout of the training curriculum developed with the University of Maiduguri on “Psychosocial counselling and conflict resolution”. The curriculum was developed with the intent to ensure sustainability, and localize the MHPSS response in Northeast Nigeria, while also building national capacity.
  • Adaptation and transfer of the curriculum developed in coordination with the University of Maiduguri to other locations in the North of Nigeria, to ensure increased capacities for MHPSS service provision in the North. 
  • Support to the BAY States governments to gather and maintain appropriate data on MHPSS and strengthen community-based approaches, ensure that standards are followed, thereby strengthening the referral networks and data-sharing practices among the MHPSS responders in the BAY States and the Northwest.
Funding required
$2,250,000
Plan types

Health system strengthening

As part of IOM’s transition, recovery, and solutions effort, working with the Ministry of Health and other partners to strengthen the Health System and restore adequate and dignified health care for crisis-affected communities by targeting 20 PHC facilities in five states (Borno, Yobe, Adamawa, Kano, and Katsina). The planned activities include:

  • Assessment of the conditions, and functional status of primary healthcare facilities in and around solutions pilot locations including health workers, medical equipment, treatment, and medical supplies. 
  • Collaboration with the Ministry of Health, WHO, UNICEF, and other relevant partners to renovate the physical structures of health facilities.
  • Collaboration with the Ministry of Health and other partners for the restoration of health service delivery including medical staff and medical supplies.
  • Promotion of IDPs and host communities’ awareness and access to basic public health care including maternal and child health (MC), vaccination, health care, and health education. 
Funding required
$3,000,000
Plan types

Peacebuilding and peace preservation

IOM is intensifying peacebuilding efforts in Nigeria, particularly addressing conflict roots, and fostering community harmony. Key initiatives to be implemented are:

  • Adoption of a Community-Based Approach to analyse and address local challenges and lead community dialogues for reconciliation and peace.
  • Economic Empowerment: Promotion of youth and women's involvement in civic activities and boost local economies via SME grants and vocational programs.
  • Natural Resource Management: Conduct of community-driven resource mapping for sustainable management and educate communities about climate change impacts.
  • Transitional Justice & Judicial Enhancement: Reform of policies causing displacement or population mistreatment and build capacity among judiciary officials for equitable proceedings.
  • Local Governance Trust: Provision of local authorities with resources to rebuild and uphold community trust.
  • Strengthening of state peace coordination, customizing based on community requisites.
  • Provision of centre and non-centre capacity building, medical and psychosocial assistance, and socioeconomic support to facilitate the reintegration of former associates who have left areas controlled by the NSAGs, including former low-risk associates, farmers, and unaccompanied individuals, and receiving communities into their community.
  • Strengthening of the reintegration process for women returning to the communities by addressing mental health needs and supporting women's participation in disengagement, disassociation, reintegration and reconciliation (DDRR)-related programme.
  • Support to the communities of return targeting vulnerable individuals with the provision of socioeconomic counselling (SEC) support and addressing mental health needs targeting specifically vulnerable members of the community.
  • Strengthening of the capacity of government agencies and civil society organizations to deliver effective reintegration and reconciliation processes. Furthermore, IOM will provide capacity building with a gender focus to CSOs based in the area of implementation to enhance their capacity to provide gender-sensitive DDRR assistance to the former NSAG associates and host communities.
  • Monitoring of the reintegration and reconciliation processes throughout the implementation of the Information, Counselling, and Referral Services System (ICRS) for former NSAG members. This will be in coordination with relevant government agencies.
Funding required
$11,000,000
Plan types

Community stabilization

IOM Nigeria’s community stabilization programming is guided by community-driven, community-owned, and development-oriented principles to address crisis or fragile contexts, which aim to prevent, mitigate, and reduce the drivers and negative effects of displacement, the numerous and complex drivers of instability and insecurity. IOM Nigeria’s community stabilization approaches include a wide range of multi-sectoral interventions at individual, household, community, and systems levels. The following activities will be implemented:

  • Support to crisis-affected and displaced communities with access to basic services through renovation/reconstruction and expansion of facilities including schools, health facilities, markets, and local infrastructures such as bridges, access to water and sanitation among others.
  • Promotion of local community structures and traditional and religious values to enhance social cohesion such as by supporting local leaders' capacity and restoring prayer sites.
  • Promotion of the active participation of women, youth, elders, and other vulnerable community members such as people with disabilities participate and contribute to communal projects and initiatives.
  • Facilitation of inter-communal dialogue on pressing community concerns, for example on climate change and its impact through trained community dialogue facilitators selected from the same communities and engaged with IEC equipment and tools such as radio listening groups.
  • Support to youth facilities that promote healthy and friendly interactions, communications, and peer support systems by organizing tournaments, art and science development opportunities, and access to ICT tools and skills.
  • Support through training for the development of the capacity of local governance including statutory and customary leaders, transitional justice principles and practices to enhance the protection of basic rights of local communities and their participation in decision making.
  • Provision of vocational training to increase employability. Introduction of job creation activities, through agriculture community-based projects.
  • Strengthen trust between communities and their leaders through transparent and accountable governance.
Funding required
$17,800,000
Plan types

Adaptation and disaster risk reduction

IOM will support local authorities through key partners including the Federal Ministry of Humanitarian Affairs, Disaster Management and Social Development, National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA), State Emergency Management Agencies (SEMAs), and the National Commission for Refugees, Migrants and Internally Displaced Persons (NCFRMI) to reduce the risk of disasters through:  

  • Implementation of small-scale infrastructural mitigation works, notably to reduce flood risk; 
  • Mapping of potential disaster risks and safe areas along identified hazardous zones (i.e. prone to the risk of flooding and wildfires); 
  • Conduct of an in-depth technical remote sensing flood risk and vulnerability mapping of target areas;  
  • Review and enhance the  early warning system to monitor water levels to promote early response in the case of high risk of flooding;
  • Construction and rehabilitation of public infrastructure, including rainwater runoff systems, retention walls, spate irrigation, and more to mitigate the impact of climate change including unseasonal rainfall, flooding, and landslides. Special emphasis will be given to the reuse potential of flood water for agriculture purposes at the community level;
  • Building capacity of knowledge management within the government response mechanisms; 
  • Awareness-raising and support to communities to understand risks and implement preventive practices as well as capacity building on building back safer; 
  • Community-based early warning systems to help communities taking early actions to reduce flood-related losses and damages; 
  • Capacity building of the Nigeria government and local governance actors to reinforce disaster risk monitoring and ensure more regular reporting on hazards to the relevant Government units; 
  • Implementation of the Emergency Tracking Tool (ETT) to provide information on sudden natural hazards, conflicts that may have implication on the displacement of people;   
  • Afforestation in the areas of displacement and return of IDPs to address the deforestation induced by displacement. This is expected to mitigate disaster risk and act as a prevention measure;
  • To support NEMA/SEMA DRR Plan. 
Funding required
$10,000,000
Plan types
Operational presence in

Nigeria

68
International staff and affiliated work force
1175
National staff and affiliated work force
6
IOM field office

The map used here is for illustration purposes only. Names and boundaries do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by IOM.

Figures are as of 31 December 2023. For more details of IOM's operational capacity in country, please see the IOM Capacity section.